Town_in_logo.png
 
Town In Peril

An adventure fantasy, RPG made at MediaGymnasiet. As a humble traveler you take on the task to save a town from it's curse.

Your task is to find the holy artifact to save the town from it's destruction. But it wont be easy when there are monster in your way.

Project Details

Platform: PC, Console

Genre: Adventure fantasy, RPG

Engine & Tools: GameMaker, GML

Development: 6 months

Team: Three Game Designers

Town_in_town_edited.jpg
My Work
Artwork/Sprites

During this project I was the only one working as a graphics artist as well as a narrative designer.

We came to the conclusion that he art should be more fantasy and pixilated. Because of the engine I had to draw the frames individually.

Here is some of that work.

Sprites.png
Enemy_Sprite.png

Movement Sprites

For the running animation I had to think about a lot of different thing, some of those things where: Which hand he's holding the Sword/Bow in, The bow string is on the right side and also where the scabbard is placed.

Attack/Ability Sprites

The attacking and abilities sprites where like the movement, I had to keep in my which side where facing the camera.

 

So in short I had make sure to make a rational animation based on the angle you the player the character from.

The Narrative

When writing the narrative we didn't want it to be something to complex, but something easy to digestSo I used a very common trope, with you being the "hero" about to save a doomed town.

Town_in_town.png

The quest is to fight your way through hordes of zombies and slimes, and get to the flaming demon so you can obtain the holy artifact to cleanse the town.

It's about this adventurer who talks to the town folks, they then send him to the priest whom gives you the quest.

 

What I learned

This being my first ever big project, it was a gateway into how it actually feels to develop a game. I got experience everything from overscoping to crunching.

We had a schedule and everything schedule plan that we had, but we side railed a a little.

But what I learned from this project was that you can't predict anything, and the smallest changes can have big impacts.